UK to have “Cyber Reserve” force

The UK government is implementing a so-called “Cyber Reserve” team to help defend the country from online security threats. There has been much made, recently, of the emergence of “cyber-warfare” and the fact that the combat of the future may … Continue reading

Originally posted here: UK to have “Cyber Reserve” force
at Techwatch Tech News – Digital & Satellite TV, 3DTV, HDTV, IPTV, Computers, Mobiles, Gaming, Internet, and Telecoms
NEW! Also see the Techwatch Glossary

Anonymous cost PayPal £3.5 million

The cost of “hacktivist” collective Anonymous’ attacks on the PayPal website in 2010 has been put at some £3.5 million. The figure emerged, as the BBC reports, during a court case against one of the British hackers who is alleged … Continue reading

Originally posted here: Anonymous cost PayPal £3.5 million
at Techwatch Tech News – Digital & Satellite TV, 3DTV, HDTV, IPTV, Computers, Mobiles, Gaming, Internet, and Telecoms
NEW! Also see the Techwatch Glossary

Google URL removal requests double in a month

The number of DMCA requests filed at Google for copyright infringement has more than doubled over the past month. This is according to the latest figures from Google – now included in the company’s transparency report – showing which governments … Continue reading

Originally posted here: Google URL removal requests double in a month
at Techwatch Tech News – Digital & Satellite TV, 3DTV, HDTV, IPTV, Computers, Mobiles, Gaming, Internet, and Telecoms
NEW! Also see the Techwatch Glossary

vbseo forums attacked by 123url.info

High traffic vbulletin forums, using the vbseo URL rewrite plugin, have suffered from two weeks or relentless attacks from hackers. However, a way to close the vulnerability has been offered by vbseo support staff, suggesting that changing the server setting … Continue reading

A TV aerial is an antenna device which is used to receive a signal, which it translates into a picture on your television. Or that’s certainly the theory, anyway, but some aerials are better than others.

Get the television aerials you need with May’s Aerials.

FT.com caught powering illegal hacking sites via Infinityads

News International properties such as FT.com are being heavily advertised on websites known to be used by hackers to profit from their activities. The hackers inject a redirect into the Javascript files of an unsuspecting website, so that any traffic … Continue reading

FT.com caught powering illegal hacking sites via Infinityads is taken from Techwatch: Tech News – Digital & Satellite TV, 3DTV, HDTV, IPTV, Computers, Mobiles, Gaming, Internet, and Telecoms

Also, check out the Techwatch technology forums.

Weak passwords still a problem

Research conducted by the University of Cambridge has shown that the average password is still rather weak. Even in these days of many successful high profile hacks, users are failing to protect themselves with a decently secure password. Should hackers … Continue reading

Weak passwords still a problem is taken from: Techwatch: Technology News

Also see the Techwatch digital TV and satellite forums here: Techwatch forums

avast! Free Antivirus for Mac tops CNET’s download.com in 3 days

Three days after its release avast! Free Antivirus for Mac shot to first position in the ‘Most Popular Mac Downloads’ section of CNET’s Download.com, surpassing Mac security products from other vendors as well as all music, video, browsing, or other … Continue reading

avast! Free Antivirus for Mac tops CNET’s download.com in 3 days is taken from: Techwatch: Technology News

Also see the Techwatch digital TV and satellite forums here: Techwatch forums

How to remove Win 7 Home Security 2012

Win 7 Home Security 2012 is a piece of malware doing the rounds at the moment, being distributed via infected ads across a number of high traffic sites.

Win 7 Home Security 2012 is a piece of malware that hijacks a user’s PC, issues false alerts, and insists it won’t go away unless you pay via a registration that aims to look like it’s coming from Microsoft.

And a nasty piece of work it is, as it attempts to take control of the user’s PC – every time you try and click on a program, Win 7 Home Security 2012 activates itself, displaying a bogus warning.

And it also hijacks popular browsers such as Internet Explorer and Firefox, providing false firewalls warnings.

All in all, the malware attempts to panic the user by locking down normal PC functions so that the user pays up.

While distressing if infected, luckily it’s relatively easy to remove.

BleepingComputer posts an invaluable tutorial on how to do this here: Remove Win 7 Home Security 2012 (Uninstall Guide)

The key steps to remove an infection of Win 7 Home Security 2012 are:

  • From an uninfected computer, download the file FIXNCR.reg and save to a USB stick, CD, or similar removable media
  • Insert media into the affected computer and double click on FIXNCR.reg

This should help clear your registry enough to allow relatively normal operation of your PC – enough at least to get the Win 7 Home Security 2012 malware removed.

  • Download RKill to your infected computer’s desktop
  • Now double-click the desktop icon for RKill – this should stop the malware from running.

But do not restart your PC yet!

  • Now download the latest version of MalwareBytes and run it on the infected machine – do a full scan

This should allow you to quarrantine the source program for the malware, and remove it.

And now your PC should be clear.

Should you continue to have any problems, ask in the BleepingComputer forums.

In the meantime, should you have actually paid for Win 7 Home Security 2012, contact your credit card provider to have the charges reversed – simply tell them it was a piece of malware that had infected your PC, demanding a payment until you paid up, and the credit card company should be able to reverse the payment.

New research finds Chrome is most secure browser

New research from Accuvant LABS has looked into the security of the three most widely used browsers and has found that overall, the most secure is Google Chrome.

The research was commissioned by Google, however, although it’s described as being a “comprehensive and independently designed security analysis” which is intended to “advance discussion of best practices in the security community.”

Accuvant say that security can be confusing for the average user when it comes to the best browser as marketing materials are often contradictory.

This leads to most users having little clue as to how secure each browser is and the company says that their research aims to fix this.

Many consumers use Firefox as it has a reputation for being the most secure, however, this particular report has the Mozilla browser coming in last place in the top three behind Internet Explorer.

The research compared browsers “from a layered perspective” as well as “taking into account security architecture and anti-exploitation techniques.”

“Like antivirus or anti-malware software, each provides an additional layer of defense. The nice thing is, when anti-exploitation technology prevents an attack, anti-malware and antivirus aren’t needed. The idea is that it’s a lot easier to keep a fortress with a moat safe than it is to protect a beach shack,” the report explains.

The 120 page report on the findings of the research is complex and technical which is part of the reason that browsers haven’t been compared in this way before.

The technologies relate “to how the inner workings of a computer go about their business and understanding and comparing them is quite a task.”

The company behind the research have also made their findings available to the public as they have apparently strived to ensure that the study stands up to outside scrutiny. As such, all of the data collected and tools used are accessible.

The research looked at the anti-exploitation measures each browser had in place by examining the internals of the software and seeing how they were implemented.

This, they say, is the most effective way to judge security in each product.

This showed that Google Chrome is the most secure browser due to its plug-in security and sandboxing architectures which are more thorough and comprehensive than Firefox’s and IEs.

Romanian hackers steal millions from Subway

Romanian hackers have had an indictment served upon them in the US, after an investigation uncovered the hacking of 150 Subway stores, along with 50 other unnamed retailers.

It is thought that the attacks compromised the credit card details of over 80,000 customers and millions of dollars worth of unauthorised purchases were carried out.

The indictment names four Romanians as the perpetrators as well as two unnamed defendants who are at an “unknown location”, and it includes the hacker’s online monikers.

The attackers first scanned the internet for point of sale (POS) systems which were vulnerable and then used password crackers to obtain entry.

They then installed keyloggers in order to record the information, which was processed using the machines.

This included customer details such as credit card numbers and PINs as well as store information which was inputted.

The hackers also installed a back door trojan which gave them future access and allowed them to install further malicious programs designed to help carry out the fraud.

Once the required information was obtained, the attackers uploaded these to US-based “dump sites” which had been specially created. These were computers owned by US consumers who had no idea that their machines were being used for other purposes.

Once the stolen data had been successfully stored, it was then transferred to overseas computers where the defendants “monetized” it by making unauthorised charges or selling the data.

The hackers also made phoney credit cards with the information stored on them by using magnetic strip readers/ writers and card embossers, before making purchases with them across Europe.

The thieves were tracked down through email and online chats in which they talked about selling the stolen data and various targets. They also discussed obtaining card numbers with higher credit limits so that the cards could be used in certain outlets in Europe.

The fraud is thought to have been carried out between 2008 and 2010.